How an old postcard led art historians to the spot where a distraught Van Gogh made his final painting

The great artist Vincent van Gogh was painting just hours before his fatal, likely self-inflicted shooting—and now it would appear that we know exactly where, thanks to the discovery of a historical postcard of a bicyclist on the Rue Daubigny in Auvers-sur-Oise, the town 20 miles north of Paris where Van Gogh spent his final days.

The breakthrough was made by Wouter van der Veen, the scientific director of the Institut van Gogh, a nonprofit in charge of preserving Van Gogh’s Auvers lodgings, in the Auberge Ravoux inn.

“Every element of this mysterious painting can be explained by observation of the postcard and the location: The shape of the hillside, the roots, their relation to each other, the composition of the earth and the presence of a steep limestone face,” he said in a statement issued by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, which has endorsed the finding.

A 94-year-old French woman had lent Van der Veen her collection historical postcards for his research, but the significance of the image, taken around 1905, didn’t initially register. Then, one day during lockdown, he realized that there was something familiar at about the gnarled tree roots and vegetation on the side of the path. Could this be what Van Gogh had been looking at the very last time he took paintbrush to canvas?
Courtesy of Artnet News
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Art to inspire your week…

Art comes in so many different forms and we hope that we can pick something that will resonate with you this week. Nostalgia, magical amazingness, therapeutic thoughtfulness, whatever you feel, please enjoy and have a lovely week ahead.

If you are tempted to make any of these beautiful works part of your life please contact us directly and we’ll make this happen for you…

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New Artist Collaboration Charlotte Elizabeth

We are really missing our face to face interactions with all our overseas friends, art lovers, collectors and the wonderful artists we meet along the way. Whilst we wait patiently until we can connect up again in person we are keeping up our arty communications and networking in a more virtual sense. We are delighted to introduce you to Charlotte Elizabeth, a wonderful artist we met in Hong Kong, Australia, Singapore and have continued to chat with through isolation in the UK. This is a truly exciting international collaboration!!

Charlotte has had a fascinating and exotic career to-date. After studying theatre design her working life began as a theatrical scenic artist in London’s West End, working alongside some of the best scenic painters, creating the backdrops for performances in renowned theatres and venues.

Following a move to Asia, Charlotte began to paint professionally as a career solo artist with great success introducing her signature work of ‘ethereal abstract cloudscapes’. Now having relocated to York in the UK, Charlotte continues to produce stunning new works. You can experience both the stormy boldness and the subtle, delicate wisps of gentle clouds. The paintings are breathtakingly strong with a mystical essence that draw you into the realms of wonderland and magic.
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Stunned conservators just found a ghostly Picasso hidden beneath one of the Art Institute of Chicago’s most treasured paintings

What’s better than one Picasso? How about a second Picasso lost for decades?

That’s exactly what a team of research scientists at the Art Institute of Chicago discovered and wrote about in a report published this week in Applied Science.

Pablo Picasso’s 1922 canvas, Still Life, has been one of the jewels in the museum’s collection since it was donated in 1953 by Alice Toklas on behalf of her late partner, the writer Gertrude Stein. The work dates to Picasso’s late Cubist period, when the artist experimented with flat grids underlying colour fields and thick lines.

Over the course of two weeks, Picasso painted three very similar works, all depicting a guitar flanked by a bottle and a bowl. Researchers at the Art Institute chose to study the painting because of the degree of complexity within its painted surface, which appeared to be wrinkled with multiple layers.

“Scientific analysis of Picasso’s Still Life was crucial to our understanding of Picasso’s creative process and how he manipulated his paints to achieve different visual effects,” conservator Kim Muir, who worked on the project, tells Artnet News.

The researchers applied X-radiography and infrared imaging to get a closer look, and were stunned to find an entirely different composition beneath the painting. And this one was oriented vertically, instead of horizontally, as in the finished work.
Courtesy of Artnet News
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Art to inspire your week…

Some of us are experiencing more freedom than others at this time. Hopefully you can take a moment to enjoy some creative beauty through the works we have chosen for you this week.

If you are tempted to make any of these beautiful works part of your life please contact us directly and we’ll make this happen for you…

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